August 09, 2016

Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of The Moon (1973) ☠

*Original first pressing on CD.
Country: United Kingdom
Genre: Psychedelic Rock
.FLAC via Mega (Link)
.AAC 256 kbps via Mega (Link)
☠: Selected by Buccaneer
© © 1973-1985 Capitol Records
AllMusic Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
By condensing the sonic explorations of Meddle to actual songs and adding a lush, immaculate production to their trippiest instrumental sections, Pink Floyd inadvertently designed their commercial breakthrough with Dark Side of the Moon. The primary revelation of Dark Side of the Moon is what a little focus does for the band. Roger Waters wrote a series of songs about mundane, everyday details which aren't that impressive by themselves, but when given the sonic backdrop of Floyd's slow, atmospheric soundscapes and carefully placed sound effects, they achieve an emotional resonance. But what gives the album true power is the subtly textured music, which evolves from ponderous, neo-psychedelic art rock to jazz fusion and blues-rock before turning back to psychedelia. It's dense with detail, but leisurely paced, creating its own dark, haunting world. Pink Floyd may have better albums than Dark Side of the Moon, but no other record defines them quite as well as this one.

tags: pink floyd, the dark side of the moon, darkside, 1973, flac,

12 comments:

  1. Link is Dead..

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the heads up. Both links have been fixed.

      Delete
  2. AnonymousMay 19, 2018

    What bit rate is this?

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    1. This is a CD rip. It's 16 bit 44.100 kHz. All of the files here are CD digital audio. We don't do vinyl rips or 24 bit HD audio. This is the original first pressing released on CD.

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  3. these flac files are fake, the frequency cut toff is the same as a 320 kbps mp3 file, i have compared them to some real flac files

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  4. Baby boy, these are CD rips. A frequency spectrum is not always the best way to determine if a Flac file is genuine. There are many first pressings from the 80's that don't go past the 20 mark. This is the result of the mastering and not because it is fake. Modern remasters and modern Pink Floyd remasters regularly go past the 20 mark because they are louder. Any recording that was done in the 70's, on a Vinyl release, will appear to have a cut off in it's original first CD pressing. Why? Because of mastering. Vinyl is analogue. CD is digital. Big difference. From the late 80's to the late 90's is when recordings go past the 20 mark on a spectrum image. Why? Because CD digital audio at 44.100 kHz became the standard format for the music industry. And even then, you can still see several pressings that have been mastered to not go past the 20 mark.

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    1. As a consumer who has purchased CD's in the past, I can confirm that everything you said is true. Some of my heavy metal CD's from the 80s like TT Quik show something similar to a cut off when viewed in a spectrum program. The reason for this is simply because the human ear can't hear past 20 kHz so the engineers simply mastered it at 20 kHz just like you said. Modern recordings are just too loud and full of dynamic range and distortion so of course its going to go past 20 kHz under the spectrum. "Baby Girl" Lass is correct. Mr. "Real FLAC file" over here has clearly never ripped a CD in his life, or has never bought a CD from the early 80s becausea lot of them appear that way buddy.

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    2. Digital recording has harsher overload characteristics, i.e., when momentarily exceeding the maximum digital recording levels, than analogue and when digital recording was new in the early 1980's recording engineers were careful to under-record slightly so as not to exceed the bit-range of the early digital recording equipment, the very earliest of which were made by converting studio video recorders, as can be seen on albums such as Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Welcome to the Pleasuredome" and Propaganda's "A Secret Wish" where the 'SMPTE Timecodes' are detailed on the track listings.

      Hence many of the earliest CD album issues were of comparatively mediocre quality compared to what was theoretically possible, and so later re-mastering can bring big improvements in sound quality

      Gag Helfront

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    3. Correct. Addressing "Mr. Real Flac Files" While I won't dump on you for speaking your mind, your comment does actually reveal that you've never purchased a CD from the 80's. If you had or did, then you you would have seen the disclaimer that is present in virtually all first CD pressings of various albums from the 60's, 70's and early to mid 80's as well as any album that was recorded during the 80's on Analogue equipment which was then transferred over and mastered in digital audio. The disclaimer is present inside of almost every CD booklet from the time period and it reads, verbatim, like this..

      "The music on this Compact Disc was originally recorded on analog equipment. We have attempted to preserve, as closely as possible, the sound of the original recording. Because of it's high resolution, however, the Compact Disc can reveal limitations of the source tape."

      There is such a thing as a lossless audio file that does not pass the 20kHz mark and there was an era where recordings didn't pass and were not mastered to go higher than 20 kHz on a audio spectrum. Purchase music from the era on CD and draw your own conclusion.

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  5. Thank you very much.

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