September 29, 2017

Krokus - Rock The Block (2003)

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 2003 Reality Entertainment
AllMusic Review by Greg Prato
When AC/DC exploded on the charts in the early '80s (thanks to the blockbuster classics Back in Black and Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap), there suddenly seemed to be legions of groups that sonically emulated the group -- especially their "Bon Scott era." Included in this "pack" were Rose Tattoo, Angels (also known as Angel City), and Heaven. But the one that enjoyed the most success stateside was Switzerland's Krokus, thanks in part to a plumb opening spot on Def Leppard's sold-out Pyromania tour, and moderate hit albums (1983's Headhunter and 1984's The Blitz). But the group (which was fronted by Marc Storace, undoubtedly one of the more interesting-looking singers in metal history) was unable to sustain its success and, throughout the '90s and early 21st century, would reunite for new albums and tours, with various members coming and going. 2003's Rock the Block was the first Krokus release to see Storace behind the mic in some time, and unlike when they were obviously trying to score a glossy radio hit in the mid-'80s, Rock the Block sees a band that has gotten back to its AC/DC roots, as evidenced by such tracks as "Mad World" and "I Want It All."

tags: krokus, rock the block, 2003,

Krokus - Hoodoo (2010)

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 2010 Columbia/Sony Records
AllMusic Review by Alexey Eremenko
The best AC/DC impersonators in the world are back, and they're rocking as hard as ever. Hoodoo was hailed as a comeback album for Krokus, but for a band that was established in 1974 and went through a number of hiatuses, a four-year gap between records is just one milestone among many. There's honestly little that needs to be said about the music on Hoodoo, because the AC/DC reference really sums it all up: this is dirty, swaggering rock & roll, a heap of primitive bluesy riffs piled over a nondescript rhythm section that is there for the sole purpose of compelling the listener to tramp down that accelerator pedal on the highway. The lyrics are even simpler that those of AC/DC, and Marc Storace is a clone of Bon Scott, though maybe a tad less rowdy, naughty, and lewdly suggestive in approach -- not for lack of trying, of course. In the past, Krokus were known to dabble in a number of styles, right down to symphonic prog of their roots, but this is all in the past, and Hoodoo is as solid as a wrecking ball, with the exception of "Ride into the Sun" and "Firestar." The former is a more serious, midtempo number, equally similar to AC/DC's "Hail Caesar" and Def Leppard's output circa 1983 (the Lepps had their own song named "Ride into the Sun," but this has nothing to do with the Krokus title). As for the closer, it's an ultra-raw proto-power metal song in the vein of early Grave Digger -- a nice direction, but not explored enough on the album. Generally, the sort of hard rock found on Hoodoo stopped being original around the time of Perestroika, but novelty isn't its main selling point anyway. The best testament to the quality of this record is the fact that a cover of "Born to Be Wild" blends right in without dwarfing the rest of the songs, even though those songs are 30 years too late to be classics of the same caliber.

tags: krokus, hoodoo, 2010,

Krokus - Round 13 (1999)

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1999 Phonag
AllMusic Review by Jason Anderson
After yet another in a series of near-complete lineup overhauls, Fernando Von Arb and a group of musicians calling themselves Krokus released this nondescript metal throwback on Angel Air in 2000. Titles like "Suck My Guitar," "Gypsy Love," and "Wild Times" would have been scoffed at during the group's Headhunter heyday 17 years previous, which makes their presence curious on Round 13. Unfortunately, old habits are hard to break. Speaking of old habits, no Krokus record would be complete without a note-for-note AC/DC rip-off, and "Witchhunter" fulfills that requirement with a more-than-familiar Highway to Hell-era guitar performance. Vocalist Carl Sentance doesn't ape Bon Scott or Brian Johnson the way that earlier Krokus screamers had, but such mimicry is almost this group's trademark, so the nondescript efforts of Von Arb, Sentance, guitarist Chris Lauper, bassist Many Maurer, and drummer Peter Haas end up sounding like so much '80s truck-commercial rock. A small group of Krokus loyalists still existed at the turn of the century, and this apparently necessitated the making of another dated record from Von Arb and whomever he happened to bump into at the studio, but Round 13 cannot be recommended, even to the most obsessive and misguided Krokus/Von Arb fans.

tags: krokus, round 13, 1999,

Krokus - Hellraiser (Limited Edition) (2006)

*Limited edition release. Contains 1 bonus track and 15 tracks total.

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 2006 AFM Records
AllMusic Review by Greg Prato
Thirty years after their self-titled debut album first appeared, Krokus are back for more with 2006's Hellraiser. Prior to the album's recording, the group suffered quite a blow when longtime guitarist Fernando Von Arb (who had appeared on seemingly just about every single Krokus album) had to exit the band due to complications from wrist surgery. But instead of packing it up and calling it a day, Krokus has decided to soldier on, with Mandy Meyer (who played with the band during the mid-'80s) taking Von Arb's spot. Singer Marc Storace remains behind the mic, and on such tunes as the album-opening title track and "No Risk No Gain," he still seems to be evoking the spirit of AC/DC's Bon Scott. Elsewhere, the dual guitars of "Angel of My Dreams" bring to mind Iron Maiden. Hellraiser finds Krokus following the same game plan that made them headbanger favorites for a spell during the mid-'80s.

tags: krokus, hellraiser, hell raiser, limited edition, 2006,

P.O.D. - Testify (2006)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: N眉-Metal, Alternative Metal
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© 2006 Atlantic Records
AllMusic Review by Matt Collar
Whether it be the group's Christian ethos, ethnically diverse makeup, or reggae-sunsplash-meets-Ozfest vibe, P.O.D. has always retained a bit more respectability than their rap-rock peers. Even during the group's most "nu-metal" moments, they sound like they have at least heard Bad Brains' first three albums and probably dug them. Smartly, on their fifth studio album, Testify, the band continues to eschew such rap-rock gimmicks as ancillary use of turntables and cheesy samples, and instead delivers a mature and workmanlike metal monster-piece. Bright, loud, but always artful, Testify's glossy production comes via journeyman hitmaking producer and synthesizer master Glen Ballard. While P.O.D. has lost none of their rootsy funk metal swagger, Ballard -- the man behind such pop titans as Michael Jackson, Van Halen, and Alanis Morissette -- has found a way to give them an eminently palatable studio sheen that brings to mind a deft mix of the arena rock of Asia and the Police, as much as it does Sepultura. The move toward a more polished sound also pays dividends creatively, as guitarist Jason Truby, while not quite as forward-thinking as Audioslave's Tom Morello, nonetheless shines under Ballard's approach, delivering a truly inspired and technically brilliant performance. Similarly, vocalist Sonny seems reinvigorated and practically giddy on the lead-off track, "Roots in Stereo." Spiritually, the band is as concerned as ever with Jah, inner strength, and the "blood of God's veins," and if the melancholy single "Goodbye for Now" is any indication, they still have a few inner demons to wrestle with creatively. Luckily, though, they haven't forgotten the funk, and songs such as the head-snapping "Lights Out" and the Sabbath-esque "Sounds Like War" combine a bit of hip-hop fun with Bob Marley-inspired metal faith. Throw in a couple of serendipitous guest spots from Hasidic rapper Matisyahu and by the time you get to the devastating metal-reggae album closer, "Mark My Words," you've got a band reborn.

tags: pod, p.o.d. testify, 2006,

Masta Ace - A Long Hot Summer (2004)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
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© 2004 M3 Macmil Music
*No professional reviews available for this release.

tags: masta ace, a long hot summer, 2004,

September 28, 2017

P.O.D. - The Fundamental Elements of Southtown (1999)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: N眉-Metal
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© 1999 Atlantic Records
AllMusic Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
With their full-length debut, The Fundamental Elements of Southtown, POD (Payable on Death) shows considerable promise, crafting an album that flows from aggressive rap-metal to trippy, Beastie-styled reggae dub excursions. It may be all over the map, but give the group credit for trying a bunch of styles and pulling most of them off. At times, they sound too derivative -- when they rock really hard, they sound too much like a Christian Rage Against the Machine -- but there's energy here and the roots of a distinctive sound, all of which are necessary for a strong debut.

tags: pod, p.o.d., the fundemental elementals of southtown, 1999,

P.O.D. - Brown (1996)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: N眉-Metal
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© 1996 Rescue Records
*No professional reviews available for this release.

tags: pod, p.o.d., brown, 1996,

P.O.D. - When Angels & Serpents Dance (2008)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Alternative Metal, Alternative Rock
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© 2008 INO/Columbia Records
AllMusic Review by Jared Johnson
P.O.D.'s lineup may have returned to 2001, but thankfully its sound did not. Guitarist Marcos Curiel came back to the SoCal band for the first time since Satellite, bringing his underrated talent and looming presence that had been missing on the band's subsequent releases (2003's Payable on Death and 2006's Testify). The synergy of his reappearance was obvious, even if longtime fans may have been flattened a bit to hear the band's new sound lacking the edge of earlier releases. To their credit, the new sound worked in P.O.D.'s favor since modern rock fans seemed to have left nu-metal in their wake. Indeed, Limp Bizkit and Korn fans were few and far between. No longer shouldering the nu-metal mantle, P.O.D. were free to reacquaint listeners with their versatility. The straight reggae of "I'll Be Ready," the bluesy rhythm of "It Can't Rain Everyday," and the (gasp!) acoustic ballad "Tell Me Why" show that this is not a memory piece or a tribute to harder days. When Angels and Serpents Dance represents the strength of one of Christian rock's greatest assets. Guest artists include the Marley Sisters, Mike Muir of Suicidal Tendencies, and Page Hamilton of Helmet.

tags: pod, p.o.d., when and angels and serpents dance, 2008,

P.O.D. - Satellite (2001) ☠

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Alternative Metal, N眉-Metal
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☠: Selected by Lass
© 2001 Atlantic Records
AllMusic Review by Jason Birchmeier
During an era when most heavy metal bands wallowed in their own misery, singing about pain and sadness, P.O.D. offered a more optimistic alternative. The band had been releasing music since the late '90s, but it was this album rather than its commercially overlooked predecessor, The Fundamental Elements of Southtown (1998), that reached out to countless listeners. Quite simply, you can't deny the emotion P.O.D. funnels into its songs. The sentiment feels genuine, as if this band truly cares about its listeners, one of the key reasons why this album shook the metal world in 2002. And, as most listeners will no doubt agree, it did so for the better. The metal world needed an album like Satellite in 2002, just like it needed a band like P.O.D. to challenge longtime metal heavyweights like Tool and Korn for supremacy. The spiritual, emotional band writes songs about promise and hope -- songs that inspire you to celebrate life, not despise it. It's not just the singing of vocalist Sonny either, though his soaring voice has much to do with it. Rather, it's the band as a whole that gives the songs on Satellite so much affective power. These four guys obviously love making music together, and that passion comes across in every song. Guitarist Marco, bassist Traa, and drummer Wuv fuse a variety of influences -- metal, hip-hop, dub, Rage Against the Machine -- and create music that stands on its own, apart from the many other nu-metal bands of the time. In particular, "Alive" and "Youth of the Nation" stand out as rallying calls for metal fans looking for music about living, not dying.

tags: pod, p.o.d., satellite, 2001,

September 26, 2017

Krokus - Change of Address (1986)

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1986 Artista Records
AllMusic Review by Jason Anderson
Change of Address is plainly one of the worst efforts from Swiss metal band Krokus. After the loud and energetic outfit had their single mega-hit years earlier with Headhunter, a not-so-gradual creative decline ensued that perhaps culminated (but didn't end) with the release of this limp recording. Artists like Bon Jovi and Def Leppard were re-categorizing metal during the mid-'80s, as the genre suddenly gained a huge mainstream audience thereby creating a commercial opportunity that caused many so-so metal acts to abandon their heavier musical roots. The resulting power-chord pop on records like Change of Address was consistently clich茅 and worthless. There is hardly any point in describing songs with titles like "Hard Luck Hero" and "Burning Up the Night," but they are, of course, laughably dopey and not at all ironic. People who appreciate hard rock and metal from this era's master practitioners (Iron Maiden and Judas Priest most notably) can hardly stomach records like Change of Address, as these sickly offerings had a very destructive influence on heavy metal/hard rock.

tags: krokus, change of address, 1986,

Krokus - The Blitz (1984)

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1984 Arista Records
AllMusic Review by Eduardo Rivadavia
Stylistically, The Blitz pretty much picked up where Krokus' breakthrough, Headhunter, left off. But ultimately, it failed to equal its predecessor's platinum sales, grinding to a halt just past gold status. A shambolic cover of the Sweet's "Ballroom Blitz" (which didn't sound all that great in its original version) is especially painful, and tepid rockers like "Out to Lunch" and "Hot Stuff" simply fail to excite. Still, "Midnite Maniac" was arguably the band's best single ever, and "Our Love" their most accomplished power ballad so far. Other cuts like "Rock the Nation" and "Out of Control" actually show some promise, but with clich茅d titles like these, how could they ever expect to stand out? Overall, The Blitz must still be considered a highlight of Krokus' career, but that ain't saying much.

tags: krokus, the blitz, 1984,

Krokus - Stampede (1990)

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1990 Phonag Records
AllMusic Review by Jason Anderson
One of the most interesting recordings in the Krokus discography, Stampede was not at all timely, but with its distinctly non-Krokus lineup -- including the derivative but talented vocalist Peter Tanner -- this 1990 release works as well or better than many of the band's more recognized offerings. Like his predecessor, Marc Storace, Tanner supremely rips off an AC/DC vocalist. But there's a catch; on tracks like the tragically titled "Rock and Roll Gypsy" the singer apes Brian Johnson instead of Bon Scott (whom Storace plagiarized famously). What makes things even more interesting, Tanner does a much better job (or at least a more listenable one) by occasionally riffing on Accept's Udo Dirkschneider to form an amalgam that's briefly compelling. Joining Tanner on Stampede are first-time Krokus members Manny Maurer (guitars), Tony Castell (guitars), Peter Haas (drums), and longtime Krokus guitarist/songwriter Fernando Von Arb, who curiously plays bass on this record. The power metal of the opening title track is Stampede's absolute highlight, with its tight riffing and layered choruses. From there it's mostly downhill, but the production, writing, and performances are as good as anything released by Krokus since Headhunter. Stampede isn't exactly a real Krokus recording, but it is one of the finest discs with the group's name printed on the cover.

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Krokus - Heart Attack (1988)

*Original first pressing on C.D.
Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1988 MCA Records
AllMusic Review by Jason Anderson
While released during the mid-'80s creative nadir of veteran metal outfit Krokus, and while generally derivative, 1987's Heart Attack was a significant improvement from the previous year's offering, Change of Address. By shamelessly aping years-old metal hits from Def Leppard and Judas Priest on the two opening cuts "Everybody Rocks" and "Wild Love," Krokus made it clear that they still weren't up to creating anything of their own on Heart Attack. But, fortunately, the superior production and arrangements make these tracks, and the entire release, more listenable than its predecessor. A few cuts like "Speed Up" and "Flyin' High" do deserve credit for not being shameless rip-offs of specific commercial metal hits. In fact, these tracks aren't really bad at all, but, unfortunately, that's about the best that can be said for this disc. There are a couple nice riffs, but the dated drum sounds, the clich茅-ridden titles and lyrics, and the foolish reconstruction of more successful recordings make Heart Attack an impossible recommendation.

tags: krokus, heart attack, 1986,

Tha Dogg Pound - That Was Then This Is Now (2009)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
Style: Gangsta Rap
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© 2009 Gangsta Advisory Recordz
*No professional reviews available for this release.

tags: tha dogg pound, that was then this is now, the dog pound, 2009,

Tha Dogg Pound - Dogg Chit (2007)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
Style: Gangsta Rap
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© 2007 Koch Records
AllMusic Review by David Jeffries
After taking a four-year break before their last album, 2006's Cali Iz Active, Tha Dogg Pound are making up for lost time by not even letting a year pass before releasing Dogg Chit. One can wonder if it had anything to do with Active's low sales, since nobody seemed to want Tha Pound lifted out of the ghetto and onto the charts. If the artwork's reference to their debut didn't clue you in, Dogg Chit is a return to the bleak and brutal world they explored back in 1995. It's all convincing, going against any thought the return to form is contrived and forced, and beats are so G-funk it's only when the Game shows up that the album feels post-2000. Paternity tests come under fire on the amusing "Dat Ain't My Baby," and "Vibe" forgets about carrying heat for a change, but the rest of the album is pure thugging and won't recruit any new fans. Course, when they partied it up less than a year before, nobody noticed, so this traditional, almost entirely Daz-produced effort is no big surprise. That it's so good after such little time passed is a surprise, and entirely welcome one.

 tags: tha dogg pound, dogg chit, 2007, the dog pound,

Tha Dogg Pound - Dillinger & Young Gotti (2001)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
Style: Gangsta Rap
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© 2001 DPG Recordz
AllMusic Review by Jon Azpiri
In the wake of all that has transpired in the saga of Death Row Records, Daz Dillinger and Kurupt are two of the only artists to come out unscathed. While Suge Knight was sentenced to jail time and 2Pac was murdered, Daz and Kurupt laid low for several years after the release of their 1995 album Dogg Food. In 2001, with a new name and a new label, the artists formerly known as the Dogg Pound are back with more of that West Coast G-funk that made Death Row famous in the first place. Daz openly flaunts his gang affiliation on "DPG" while Xzibit makes a cameo on the stellar track "Gangsta-Like." For the most part, DPG has put together a winning package of G-funk that is far from fresh but still entertaining. A lot has happened since Daz and Kurupt's heyday with Death Row, but this album proves that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

tags: tha dogg pound, the dog pound, dillinger and gotti, 2001,

Tha Dogg Pound - Dillinger & Young Gotti II: Tha Saga Continues (2005)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
Style: Gangsta Rap
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© 2005 Gangsta Advisory
*No professional reviews available for this release.

tags: tha dogg pound, the dog pound, dillinger and young gotti 2 the saga continues, 2005,

Krokus - Headhunter (1988) ☠

*Original first pressing on C.D.
Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1983-1988 Artista Records
AllMusic Review by Eduardo Rivadavia
Swiss rockers Krokus had already been around the bend a number of times by the time they scored their first (and only) American platinum success with 1983's Headhunter. Shameless bandwagon hoppers that they were (their origins lay in cheesy, late-'70s progressive rock), the band at least deserve credit for mixing their musical stew just right on this occasion. The results include the frenetic title track, a highly competent power ballad in "Screaming in the Night," and their biggest hit -- a reworking of Bachman Turner Overdrive's "Stayed Awake All Night." Mid-tempo rockers such as "Eat the Rich" and "Russian Winter" also receive energetic performances from the band, but singer Marc Storace generally makes a nuisance of himself with his grating screech, which falls somewhere between Bon Scott and Accept's Udo Dirkschneider. Though their ridiculous attempt to emulate the pop-metal posturing of the day (guitarist Fernando Von Arb's incessant pouting remains an especially horrifying image) would do them little good, Headhunter, at least, remains Krokus' finest moment.

tags: krokus, headhunter, head hunter, 1983,

Tha Dogg Pound - Cali Iz Active (2006)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
Style: Gangsta Rap
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© 2006 Koch Records
AllMusic Review by David Jeffries
With its crooked, crooked West Coast beat and the glorious TGIF chorus thrown on top of it, lead single "Cali Iz Active" came on the scene and ruled every beatbox that knew what was up. But just like the cover artwork to the album Cali Iz Active, the wicked title cut misrepresents what is really a reunion of the original Dogg Pound duo, Daz Dillinger and Kurupt, with only a couple of appearances by executive producer Snoop Dogg. One listen through this heat-carrying album and it doesn't matter much, since the long-estranged Daz and Kurupt are lyrically inspired here, have lost none of their chemistry, and their choices for producers and guest stars are either smart or risky. Falling into the latter category is Diddy's appearance on "It's Craccin All Night," a surprisingly successful track that figures into the handful of highlights. "Sittin on 23z" kicks its way into this category thanks to a monstrous beat by Swizz Beatz that shakes the foundations. The cuts with David Banner and Paul Wall do a good job of blending Southern and West Coast attitudes, but the West Coast heads are going to appreciate the Ice Cube, Nate Dogg, and Lady of Rage guest shots the most, since they brilliantly recall a time when G-funk ruled all. While it's a track or two too long, Cali Iz Active is arguably the strongest album from the crew and a West Coast fiend's dream come true.

tags: tha dogg pound, cali iz active, 2006,

Tha Dogg Pound - 100 Wayz (2010)

Country: U.S.A.
Genre: Hip-Hop
Style: Gangsta Rap
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© 2010 Felder Entertainment
*No professional reviews available for this release.

tags: tha dogg pound, 100 wayz, ways, 2010, flac, the,

Krokus - To Rock or Not To Be (2002 Reissue)

*Reissued in 2002 by CD-Maximum. Contains 1 bonus track and 13 tracks total.

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1995-2002 CD-Maximum
AllMusic Review by Jason Anderson
The first recording in years to feature classic Krokus members Marc Storace (on vocals) and guitarist/songwriter Fernando Van Arb (who together led the group to the top of the '80s metal heap during the Headhunter Blitz period), To Rock or Not to Be was a successful return to form for the Nordic metal veterans. Storace's Bon Scott impersonation actually seems to have improved with age, and on tracks like "Flying Through the Night," it's almost impossible not to think that the AC/DC screamer hasn't risen from the dead. The overall effect is enhanced by Van Arb's direct approach to power chording and song construction. Too many pseudo power metal choruses and unforgivable lyrics on tracks like the title cut and "Stop the World" keep the record from being the genuinely cool tribute to the band's early (and derivative) crunch that it should be. Considering how many years separated Krokus from their gold and platinum days, however, To Rock or Not to Be is a respectable disc that fans of the group may very well enjoy.

 tags: krokus, to rock or not to be, 1995, 2002, flac, reissue,

Krokus - Metal Rendez-vous (1980)

*Original first pressing on C.D.
Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1980-1987 Artista Records
AllMusic Review by Adam Bregman
Heavy on the cheese, Krokus' Metal Rendez-Vous is a fairly enjoyable record, though more than a little silly. The butt of jokes even within the mostly irony-free metal world, Krokus were major poseurs jumping from prog rock to glam metal in timely fashion as trends changed in the late '70s. They eventually stuck with the glam metal thing, milking it for all it was worth, and were quite successful. This record catches them with a little bit of AC/DC-style swagger and plenty of wanky guitar solos. The song "Tokyo Nights" for some reason features a reggae beat halfway through. The album has other surprises, like the way over-the-top power ballad "Streamer," which is incredibly ridiculous and dated. But Metal Rendez-Vous definitely has some kitsch value and, like Spinal Tap, is occasionally very funny, though in Krokus' case, it is definitely an unconscious thing. Despite that, they do know how to rock and can play their instruments better than your average poodle-haired metal dudes.

tags: krokus, metal rendez vous, 1980, flac,

Krokus - To You All (1977)

*Reissued by Sound Service. No reissue date is provided in the CD booklet, inlay or in the credits.

Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Genre: Hard Rock
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© 1977-?? Sound Service
AllMusic Review by Eduardo Rivadavia
After doing their part to destroy progressive rock's good name with their eponymous first album's "everything but the kitchen sink" songwriting schizophrenia, Krokus started feeling their way toward a far less complicated and ultimately more successful form of hard rock with their 1977 sophomore album, To You All. Indeed, only guitarist Tommy Kiefer and drummer -- now vocalist -- Chris Von Rohr remained from that ill-starred debut's recording lineup, and although they were backed by yet another short-lived rhythm section here (comprised of bassist J眉rg Naegeli and drummer Freddy Steady), To You All is notable for heralding the arrival of second guitarist Fernando Von Arb, who would eventually take charge of the band during its mid-'80s glory years. Unfortunately, those years still seemed like an almost impossible dream in light of the frustratingly mixed results presented here, as Krokus insisted on diluting their increasingly cohesive heavy rock numbers, like the glam-flavored title track, the Kiss-like "Mr. Greedy," and the Southern rock candidate "Lonesome Rider," with unsatisfying bland pop diversions like "Move It On," "Trying Hard," and their especially painful descent into tepid MOR on "Festival" (although it did conclude with an unexpectedly heavy guitar riff borrowed from Frank Zappa's "Muffin Man"). For all of these inconsistencies, To You All did yield Krokus' first domestic hit with rambunctious opener "Highway Song," and this, along with Von Rohr's imminent hard rock enlightenment while attending an AC/DC concert, effectively paved the way to the group's hard rock rebirth and subsequent recruitment of Bon Scott sound-alike Marc Storace.        

tags: krokus, to you all, 1977, flac,